Blind spots

I was driving last night with my wife, on our way to a restaurant to celebrate our anniversary. The night was cold and clear, and I was driving at a very reasonable speed, in no hurry as we were a bit early for our reservation. I approached a junction, just a short distance from the restaurant, and checked the oncoming traffic in both directions. I thought I saw a clear space and proceeded to turn left, at which point my wife yelled “Watch out! Did you not see the car coming?” I braked and let the car coming from my right pass. I breathed a sigh of relief and thanked her. I don’t know if the car had been blocked from my sight by a combination of objects in the car, or if I had blinked at an odd moment. I cannot reconstruct what happened. I did not get too exercised about the incident, and did not break out into a cold sweat or panic. But, I mentioned to my wife that observations by passengers can often irritate a driver yet when they save lives it’s the kind of interference for which to be thankful.

We all have actual blind spots, when we cannot see what should be obvious and what others probably see clearly. We also have emotional blind spots. I think the allusion is clear, so I wont belabour the point. However, in the same way that others can help us see better, we need to appreciate how others–good will presumed and abstracting from issues about the tone and manner that advice is sometimes given–can help us to become better persons. It may seem like unwanted interference, but one never knows when it can be a saving grace.

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About The Grasshopper

Professional international economist, recently retired from an international organization. I use blogging as a way of organizing my ideas and thoughts about a range of topics. I was born in Jamaica, and spent many years being educated, living, and working in the UK. I lived in the USA for a few decades, and worked and travelled abroad extensively. My views have a wide international perspective. Father of girls. Also, married to an economist.
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